News

Tinder, Google and Subaru see US biometric suit class actions

December 6, 2022
Tinder, the dating app owned by Match Group, has been sued under Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) alleging it violated the law by compiling and storing faceprints without notifying app users. Google is facing a similar class action in Louisiana that claims it violated a state statute that’s similar to BIPA by collecting and selling biometric data of state residents. There is also a proposed class action in Illinois against Subaru that alleges car models with its DriverFocus facial recognition function violate BIPA because the tool collects and stores... Read More >
CDPI Privacy Newsletter

IT’S THE LAW (12/06/2022)

December 6, 2022
Saudi Arabia’s data authority has published draft amendments to its Personal Data Protection Law (PDPL) for comments this month in preparation for changes to go into effect this spring. This includes major changes to make laws more business friendly. The Saudi Data and AI Authority (SDAIA) changes include allowing data transfers to jurisdictions that ensure appropriate privacy protection; allowing legitimate interest as a basis for processing non-sensitive data, including for location data; and a right to individual data portability.
CDPI Privacy Newsletter

Children’s Privacy: Finnish GDPR4CHLDRN initiative to establish privacy ed and training program

December 6, 2022
Finland’s Office of the Data Protection Commissioner is overseeing the GDPR4CHILDRN project, which has a 2-year plan to develop a toolkit to be used by children’s activity associations and by parents and young people to help educate about data protection for youth. Plans are for the toolkit to be published in Finnish, Swedish, and English, and translated into Russian, Estonian, Somali, and Arabic.
CDPI Privacy Newsletter

Children’s Privacy: Is passing US’ KOSA quickly a good idea or a political football?

December 6, 2022
If 90+ US human & internet rights groups are to be believed, the end-year push to get the Kids Online Safety Act (KOSA) passed by the Senate during the current lame-duck Congress may do more harm than good. The groups sent a joint letter to lawmakers saying they believe the law’s weakly defined protections for ages 16 and under could provide opportunities for censoring information about LGBTQ+ and reproductive rights and also give parents tools to spy on their kids.
CDPI Privacy Newsletter