March 12, 2018

Does Personalization Matter?

 

75% of Consumers Think Most Personalization Is Creepy: InMoment Survey

InMoment

We all know there’s a fine line between personalized and creepy, but what if all personalization is creepy? Customer intelligence platform InMoment found that 75% of consumers think most forms of personalization at least somewhat creepy. Yikes! About 20% will stop using a brand that’s too creepy and 9% will complain on social media. Double yikes! Good insights here on what makes something creepy (crossing the line between physical and digital) and what makes personalization worthwhile (VIP treatment, not recommendations or easier interactions). Food for thought if you can stomach it.

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Most Consumers Distrust Product Recommendations from Smart Speakers: OC&C Strategy Study

OC&C Strategy

If consumers think personalized recommendations are creepy, will they be even more upset about Amazon and Google listening to them 24/7? Apparently not: 13% of U.S. households had smart speakers in 2017 and 55% will have them by 2022, according to OC&C Strategy Consultants. One bit of consistency: only 39% trust the personalized product recommendations from their speakers. Much smart advice here on marketing in a voice commerce world.

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Personalized Product Recommendations Aren’t Very Important: GlobalWebIndex Report

GlobalWebIndex

More bad news: GlobalWebIndex found personalized Web site recommendations ranked a dismal 17th on the list of product discovery sources. Ray of hope: they were ahead of ads in movie theaters. Most cited sources were search engines, TV, and word of mouth.

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