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Apple’s Day in the Life of Your Data

On a more positive privacy note, Apple offered an easy-to-understand story that illustrated how its privacy controls can make a big difference.  Following the simple story of a dad taking his daughter to the park, Apple shows step-by-step how much data could be revealed by looking up the weather, checking a map, taking a photo, and other common actions — and how much of that sharing its privacy controls would prevent.

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UN Secretary-General calls for global rules oversight on social media companies

February 2, 2021

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called for a global regulatory framework to rein-in the power of social media companies like Twitter and Facebook. Speaking at a news conference, Guterres expressed grave concern about the amount of data the companies control, the potential use of that data to influence politics and our behavior, and the risks of allowing these companies to continue to have unrestricted power over our lives.

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Companies strive to make secure digital passports for COVID-19 vaccine authentication

February 2, 2021

As more people are vaccinated and we move toward a return to public events, travel and gatherings, there is a clear need to have a valid, secure way to confirm whether a given person has been vaccinated. The Commons Project and a group of health and technology companies including Microsoft, Oracle, Salesforce, Cerner, Epic and Cigna are looking to develop common standards for health cards, via a new file type that could hold vaccine records without violating privacy.

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Two-Thirds of C-Suite Can’t Recognize Bad Data: Fivetran Report

December 6, 2021

Like the determined optimist who tells his boss the factory is on fire by reporting they’ll soon be able to update their equipment, let’s find some silver linings in a batch of gloomy surveys today, Dear Reader.  We’ll start with this Fivetran report, which finds that 85% of data leaders say their company has lost money by basing decisions on bad data, and 66% believe their C-suite can’t tell when that happens.  The bright side is there’s lots of room for improvement.

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