News

Hong Kong hotel guest data hacked; hotels criticized for delayed reporting

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data in Hong Kong plans to launch a compliance review following a data breach that may have impacted 290,000 Shangri-La hotel group customers. Concern is that customers were not notified until more than two months that a breach potentially affecting their data had occurred.

More News

Next Article

Optus’ recent data hack prompts Australian government to move on “urgent” privacy reforms

October 4, 2022

Australia’s Attorney-General has said the government will make “urgent reforms” to the country’s Privacy Act following the Optus breach, where the company was blamed for lax security, resulting in the theft of nearly 10 million customer records. Resulting fines for that could reach as high as 2 million Australian dollars ($1.3 million). Certainly, it has put increased pressure on the government, which has been in process reviewing its privacy laws for several years, and now stated it may move on this within the next month.

CDPI Privacy Newsletter
Previous Article

IT’S THE LAW (10/04/2022)

October 4, 2022

There are two important new laws in California. The first, related to AB-1242, is designed to protect companies from having to respond to out-of-state search warrants that look to obtain abortion data. This will be relevant to the many internet and telecommunications based in the state and is part of a move to establish California as a sanctuary for abortion seekers. The second, AB 2089, is meant to protect patient mental health data not covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), particularly via the 20,000 or more online apps offering services based on probable diagnoses. Many harvest and then sell sensitive data that patients provide, but this would no longer be allowed.

CDPI Privacy Newsletter
Featured Article

Meta Releases Lying, Offensive AI and Pretends to Be Surprised

November 23, 2022

Like trouble, bad behavior by Meta shows up whether you look for it or not.  The latest is an open-source language model that was supposed to provide reliable search results because it was trained on academic papers.  Alas, it was quickly withdrawn after reviewers found that it returned results that were grammatical and plausible but also incorrect, not to mention filled with “antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny.”  How can this be a surprise?

CDPI Newsletter