News

IT Decision Makers Watch More, Read Less: Foundry Survey

On the off chance that CIOs really do take over the world, you’ll be interested that Foundry reports 74% of IT decision makers prefer vendors who educate them and 98% want content tailored to their industry, company size, job responsibilities and installed tech platforms.  Also, their attention spans are shrinking: they now spend more time watching videos and have less patience for written materials.  The desired maximum length shrank from 9.6 pages in 2016 to under 5 pages in 2022.

More News

Next Article

CIOs Run Everything, Say CIOs: Citrix Survey

November 21, 2022

One charmingly consistent quirk of survey research is that people overstate their importance.  This Citrix study of CIOs is an extreme case in point: two-thirds of respondents say the CIO is second only to the CEO in terms of delivering business strategy, and nearly as many expect tech leaders to be largely or entirely responsible for marketing, sales, customer experience, employee experience, talent recruitment, financial performance and pretty much everything else in the next five years.  Silly CIOs: we all know that newsletter editors are really in charge.

CDPI Newsletter
Previous Article

Highly Educated People Give Unreliable Survey Answers: Rep Data Study

November 21, 2022

Meanwhile, data collection firm Rep Data analyzed 1,800 survey responses and found that answers from mobile devices are less reliable than replies from desktop, laptop and tablet users.  More interesting: people with at least a master’s degree give lower quality answers than less educated respondents.  Answers from those who didn’t finish high school are even worse.  I wonder which category has the most CIOs?

CDPI Newsletter
Featured Article

Meta Releases Lying, Offensive AI and Pretends to Be Surprised

November 23, 2022

Like trouble, bad behavior by Meta shows up whether you look for it or not.  The latest is an open-source language model that was supposed to provide reliable search results because it was trained on academic papers.  Alas, it was quickly withdrawn after reviewers found that it returned results that were grammatical and plausible but also incorrect, not to mention filled with “antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny.”  How can this be a surprise?

CDPI Newsletter