News

81% of Firms Have Successful Big Data Projects: NewVantage Partners

NewVantage Partners advises senior business and technology executives, mostly in financial services. They polled their constituents, mostly data and analytics leaders, about big data initiatives. Nearly all (95%) had at least started a project and 81% felt they had yielded some business benefit. But, marketers may feel marginalized: the most common gains were in lower costs (49%) and innovation (44%), with new revenue ranked fourth (33%). Another interesting look at the world through non-marketer eyes.

More News

Next Article

Boxever CDP Repackages Components to Expand Beyond Travel

February 17, 2017

Let’s look at some companies outside the U.S. today.  We’ll start with Boxever, a Dublin-based Customer Data Platform and orchestration system that has specialized in the travel industry. The company has just repackaged its unification components as Boxever OneView and its orchestration tools as Boxever Engage. It’s part of a move to add retail and financial services clients. Packaging aside, the system capabilities are still pretty much as described in this recent review.on Customer Experience Matrix.

CDPI Newsletter
Previous Article

86% of Consumers Rate Good Customer Experience a Reason to Share Data: Janrain Survey

February 15, 2017

Here’s a reminder why customer experience is important: a recent Janrain survey that found that “good customer experience” is the single most important factor in convincing consumers to share personal data. Experience was important to 86% of consumers, ahead even of control over communications (78%), compelling loyalty programs (74%) and promising not to share data with third parties (71%). But it’s not all about feeling warm and fluffy: 62% said they’d register to receive a product discount.

CDPI Newsletter
Featured Article

Meta Releases Lying, Offensive AI and Pretends to Be Surprised

November 23, 2022

Like trouble, bad behavior by Meta shows up whether you look for it or not.  The latest is an open-source language model that was supposed to provide reliable search results because it was trained on academic papers.  Alas, it was quickly withdrawn after reviewers found that it returned results that were grammatical and plausible but also incorrect, not to mention filled with “antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny.”  How can this be a surprise?

CDPI Newsletter