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Despite recent app privacy changes, Apple customers are still tracked at alarming rates

URLgenius, which tracks clicks and app-opens, used the Record App Activity feature that was part of iOS 15.2 to see what network domains 200 apps in 20 app categories were connecting to. They discovered that on average apps were connecting with 15 domains and that 80% of those were to unfamiliar 3rd party domains. This was despite customer preference not to be tracked.

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Privacy specialists in demand, according to new skills gap survey

February 1, 2022

ISACA, a professional IT training organization, has issued its Privacy Practice 2022 report which shows companies reporting legal/compliance jobs (46%) and IT privacy jobs (55%) are understaffed. Between 60-70% of the companies expect to need more staff in both areas going forward, and say ideal candidates would have knowledge of compliance and legal expertise, and/or hands-on experience in a privacy role and technical experience.

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Children’s Privacy: Australian police warn parents back-to-school photos, including with kids in uniforms can present a risk for “grooming”

February 1, 2022

As children in Australia head back to school, the Australian Federation of Police (AFP) issued a reminder that posting pictures with names, information about locations, house photos, and even having kids dressed in their school uniforms can make them vulnerable to predators. Clues to a child’s identity, or about where they live or go to school can be utilized by sex offenders to befriend and gain the trust of children, making them more vulnerable to abduction or abuse.

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Meta Releases Lying, Offensive AI and Pretends to Be Surprised

November 23, 2022

Like trouble, bad behavior by Meta shows up whether you look for it or not.  The latest is an open-source language model that was supposed to provide reliable search results because it was trained on academic papers.  Alas, it was quickly withdrawn after reviewers found that it returned results that were grammatical and plausible but also incorrect, not to mention filled with “antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny.”  How can this be a surprise?

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