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Mainstream Buyers Use Smart Speakers to Replace Existing Devices: NPR Research

Just when marketers were getting used to smart phones as their primary communications channel, smart speakers could displace them. That’s the implication of an NPR study that found the latest wave of smart speaker buyers were more likely than early adopters to use them for everyday tasks like ordering food and listening to the news, and less likely to apply new functions such as controlling home appliances. In fact, 43% of recent buyers specifically intended their smart speaker to help them reduce screen time, compared with just 24% of early adopters. Not good news if you’ve built your marketing programs around mobile phones.

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Most IT Decision Makers Believe Outsiders Can Access Their Networks: Gemalto Survey

July 23, 2018

More than two-thirds (68%) of IT decision makers believe unauthorized users can access their networks yet 93% would trust their organization to store their personal data, according to this survey from digital security vendor Gemalto. Weird. Consumers have picked up on the vibe: just 52% trust organizations to manage their personal data. Click here for a slick interactive version of the report that can compare results by country.

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SMPTE Publishes Standards to Embed IDs in Broadcast Ads and Programs

July 19, 2018

Industry standards group SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers) has published standards for using audio watermarks to embed ID codes into advertising and entertainment programming. This sounds obscure but it will help tracking systems to identify when a piece of content is presented to a viewer, easing one of the big challenges in marketing measurement. That’s important.

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IT Teams Build Sloppy Automations: TeamDynamix Survey

August 17, 2022

IT teams spend lots of time on repetitive requests from business users, finds this TeamDynamix survey.  You might think the implication is IT should let users do more for themselves.  But the main time-wasters are things like password resets, employee on-boarding, and managing credentials, which can’t really be delegated.  And here’s the kicker: IT professionals automate those tasks by building sloppy, insecure, undocumented scripts, just like the non-professionals.   Fun fact: 53% of teams manage 100 or more applications.

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