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Mexico’s Supreme Court grants sweeping rights to access citizen & company bank data

Four of five Supreme Court justices voted to allow access to citizen bank documents, removing the need for  warrants. The decision is based on argument that individual rights to bank privacy is secondary to the government’s need to combat tax fraud and monitor for money laundering. Needless to say, that opens the data of millions of Mexican citizens to scrutiny without consent or specified cause. It is, however, in keeping with the aim of Mexico’s president who wants to crack down on Big Tech abuses.

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Settlement of BIPA suit puts brakes on Clearview AI across the US

May 17, 2022

Clearview AI, known for scraping billions of facial recognition images without consent and running afoul of privacy regulators in numerous countries, has met its match in the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Clearview’s agreement to settle the ACLU’s 2020 lawsuit which stated the company violated Illinois’ BIPA biometrics law means the company can’t continue to sell its software to most US companies, and sets a precedent that state privacy laws can have impact beyond state lines.

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IT’S THE LAW (05/17/2022)

May 17, 2022
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Meta Releases Lying, Offensive AI and Pretends to Be Surprised

November 23, 2022

Like trouble, bad behavior by Meta shows up whether you look for it or not.  The latest is an open-source language model that was supposed to provide reliable search results because it was trained on academic papers.  Alas, it was quickly withdrawn after reviewers found that it returned results that were grammatical and plausible but also incorrect, not to mention filled with “antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny.”  How can this be a surprise?

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